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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    160

    Default WordPress Blog vs. Website Powered by WordPress

    Hello, fellow SSWTers,

    I need your help!

    Should I continue to build my WordPress blog or build a website powered by WordPress??? My niche for this site is health & fitness. This site has the potential to grow fast with a lot of pages, so I want to plan it out with the end in mind.

    At this time, I cannot afford to invest in having a custom-designed site developed by a web designer. I plan to invest in DreamWeaver in the near future but I want to move things along with this site now. I NEED TO TAKE ACTION!!!!!

    So, if you have any knowledge or firsthand experience with this issue, please share your thoughts with me ... the up side, the down side, the pros and cons, etc.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    227

    Default

    A WordPress.com blog is fine for a completely noncommercial blog that you don't intend to invest too much of yourself in. Like any free blog service, however, you are completely at the mercy of the operators of the service. Free blogs do occasionally disappear without notice and from everything I have heard, WordPress.com seems to be more apt to do that than most. They seem to dislike any sort of business use of their service.

    Setting up a WordPress blog on a paid hosting account is fairly easy and doesn't cost a whole lot. You can get a domain name for about $10 and set up hosting with something like HostGator or Dreamhost for $10-$11 a month. These hosts will let you install WordPress automatically and you will have a huge amount of web space to use as well. And you can place multiple site domains on the same host at no extra cost.

    With your own WordPress installation, you can choose from a huge variety of themes and plugins. You can also modify them to suit your own needs. Most website operators eventually wish to place an opt-in box for a mailing list on their site. This is easy enough with a WordPress install. I'm not certain, but I don't believe WordPress.com allows this.

    So, anyway, I'd say if your serious about blogging, go with a WP.org blog rather than WP.com.

    Wade Watson

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Missouri, USA
    Posts
    950

    Default

    Iris, one install of WordPress will do both blog and web site; no need to have to choose. I agree with Wade, use the .org version and get your own web host for that.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    160

    Default

    Yes, I have my blogs set up under WordPress.org and they are hosted by HostGator.

    Should I wipe out the WP blog and reinstall it in a subfolder so that it appears as a page in my domain with a static home page? Or, can I continue to build my site with many pages under this blog layout?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Missouri, USA
    Posts
    950

    Default

    Here's instructions on how to setup one WordPress installation to run in two different folders: http://codex.wordpress.org/Giving_Wo..._Own_Directory

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    160

    Default

    Traci,

    Do you think this is a necessary step I need to do . . . set things up as a website with a blog page vs. just a WP blog? Do you think it's necessary???

  7. #7

    Default

    Iris, I think a blog is just fine and then you can always add pages on/to your wordpress blog.
    ~Angie~

    Visit Newton's Travels, a couples & multi generational travel blog!

    Twitter|Instagram

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Missouri, USA
    Posts
    950

    Default

    My new site http://yourwebtechteam.com is setup just as one WordPress.org install, with the core of the web site set up as WordPress pages, not posts. Pages are static, posts are dynamic - meaning they are automatically archived each month by month & year and they would scroll down to show the latest blog post first.

    For static content, that you need easily accessible/easy to find within your site, use pages.

    Blog posts are for articles, latest news or something like that. Pages of product, About or Contact pages are examples of content that would go on a page, not a post.

  9. #9

    Default

    Traci,

    could you (or anyone else for that matter) elaborate on this for me please. I'm not sure that I follow you.

    For static content, that you need easily accessible/easy to find within your site, use pages.

    Blog posts are for articles, latest news or something like that. Pages of product, About or Contact pages are examples of content that would go on a page, not a post.
    Thanks

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    227

    Default

    In WordPress, you have the option of creating content withing "Posts" or "Pages". WordPress treats designated Pages a bit differently from Posts. Multiple posts will appear on the main blog page, as well as on separate pages from links. Pages only appear on their own and are accessed only from links on the site, such as a header bar.

    WordPress was designed primarily for the blogging format, but it's not hard to use it as a static site by simple ignoring the blog features (Posts) and creating Pages. Under "Reading Settings" in the WP Dashboard, you can designate any Page to be replace the blog as the front page of the site. Then if you set up a nice index of internal links in the sidebar, you've turned it into a static website.

    Wade Watson

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